• Tue. Feb 27th, 2024

Another environmental impact report for public housing on Hong Kong golf course won’t be required even if legal challenge is upheld: Green Group

Another environmental impact report for public housing on Hong Kong golf course won’t be required even if legal challenge is upheld: Green Group

The government should clarify whether the environmental impact assessment will be redone as before if judicial review is lost.

The Department of Environmental Protection declined to say whether the new rules apply to the public housing project, adding that legal proceedings have already begun.

The government aims to build public flats on a 9.5-hectare residential site on the Fanning Course, run by the century-old Hong Kong Golf Club. As per the original plan, they earmarked land for 12,000 houses by 2029. Authorities are expected to reclaim the land in September.

A month after environmental authorities conditionally approved an impact assessment report, the town’s planning board agreed Monday to change the residential site’s zoning to “not determined.”

A majority of the meeting’s 22 members supported the plan, with most technical assessments finding it feasible, the site accessible and a “source of housing supply for decades to come”.

The golf club, which currently leases 172 hectares of land from the authority, expressed “deep regret” at the redevelopment, saying it was important to maintain the integrity of the facility and opposed plans to use the site for housing.

The club last week sought a judicial review to overturn the authority’s approval of the impact assessment report, saying there were errors in how it was conducted.

It points out that some legal challenges in the past have succeeded in overturning government decisions Hong Kong-Suhai-Macau Bridge The project was delayed by nine months after a judicial review was sought.

He also warned that if the government goes ahead with the golf course development project, more legal problems will arise.

In response to the club’s legal challenge, the chief executive John Lee Ka-chiu It said the judicial review application would not change the government’s plan to take back 32 hectares of the course when the lease expires in September.

Lands director Andrew Lai Chi-wa confirmed the plan on Tuesday that the Lands Department will hand over the area to the Leisure and Cultural Services Department for management after the lease expires.

He added that he had visited the site over the past month with officials from the Department of Leisure and Cultural Services and representatives of the golf club to discuss the transfer.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *